geezer cinema: linda ronstadt: the sound of my voice (rob epstein and jeffrey friedman, 2019)
music friday: sleater-kinney

tv in the 2010s: david simon, phoebe waller-bridge

I don't write as much about TV these days. One reason is that there is indeed too much good stuff ... it's hard enough to keep up with the watching, much less the writing. But I've found a catch-all way to inject TV into the blog, AV Club's "The 100 best TV shows of the 2010s". It's an obvious way to make my point about too much good stuff ... the list has 100 shows, and I haven't watched many of them (about a third). (Not to mention the thing about all such lists: each of us wonders why our favorite show didn't make the cut? Shout out to The 100, Lights Out, Agent Carter, Sweet/Vicious, Outlander, and Hot Ones.) What follows is a few comments about the shows I did watch. This will be a multiple-post thread.

The David Simon Decade (numbers are their place in the poll):

Show Me a Hero (100). A six-part miniseries, typically underestimated by everyone but critics. This is based on the true story of Yonkers mayor Nick Wasicsko and the fight to desegregate public housing. Oscar Isaac starred, and the usual bunch of top actors were happy to take part in a David Simon show. Treme (68) was, to me, Simon's best show since The Wire. A story of the resilience of New Orleans residents in the face of natural disaster and governmental neglect, it was also a musical showcase, featuring great music every episode. Notably absent from the list: Generation Kill, about soldiers in the Iraq war that worked Simon's favorite theme of institutional incompetence preventing good people from doing their job, and The Deuce, about the sex industry in the 1970s and 1980s that had more problems than is normal for a Simon series, but had some great acting. [Edited because Generation Kill was actually 2008.]

All Hail Phoebe Waller-Bridge:

She was not the best thing about Broadchurch (91), but she was in the second season. You should binge that show, and not just because of Phoebe. Her great triumph, of course, was Fleabag (10), one of the defining shows of its time, the thing that put Waller-Bridge over the top. Killing Eve (59) featured fascinating acting from Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer, and Waller-Bridge was in charge of the first season. She had less to do with Season Two, and it wasn't as good.

The jump suit that took over the fashion world:

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