what i watched last week
sympathy on sunday

sleater-kinney at the masonic

It has happened. It was necessary, and it happened. If those were the last two Sleater-Kinney concerts I attend, I can accept that. Nothing lasts forever, but there was something about The Hiatus that left a void, and now that void has been filled.

I don’t think I’ll ever get to the bottom of why I love this band so much. But there is no denying the reality of that love. And after nine years of listening to “One More Hour” and “Good Things” and fighting back tears, not always successfully, I’ve been able to reacquaint myself with their work, and whatever tears remain are tears of joy.

I’m comparing those two shows not just to the previous twelve times we’d seen them, but also to my faulty memories and the curse of nostalgia. So I can’t be certain my comparisons are accurate. But in 2015, Sleater-Kinney is tighter and more confident than ever. Corin has always had The Voice, and she’s never been shy about using it. But now, I felt a sweet pride from her ... when she sang “LAAAAAND Ho!” in “The Fox”, the look on her face said “I have this gift, and I know it, and you know it, and isn’t it grand?” While she still isn’t the most active person on stage (except for one song, which I’ll get to), she has lost all of that I’m-not-the-star feel. When I use the word “confident” about these shows, I’m talking mostly about Corin. Janet’s entire style of drumming feeds off of her confidence, so I wouldn’t say in her case that there has been a noticeable increase. Carrie, always the most charismatic one, seems much happier now. Perhaps that’s unfair ... over the years, we didn’t know how hard it was for her, but with hindsight, some of that is revealed. Yet I felt none of it in these shows ... in fact, it was a bit unsettling at times, that Carrie was having fun when the songs didn’t necessarily have a lot of fun in them. Jillian (who deserves special mention ... she and I have been to 14 S-K shows together now, it’s a wonderful thing) remembers the days when the band was looser on stage, when Carrie was goofy and Janet told jokes. Now, they plow through their songs, one after another, almost Ramonesian in the blast, with only an occasional “thank you, San Francisco”. On the second night, Carrie started talking about how they felt a special bond with San Francisco, and it was a lot like the speech she’d given the night before. But then she veered off, mentioned writing “Jumpers” here, and then going into a long, shaggy tale about recording No Cities to Love on the sly in San Francisco. At one point, she was spinning a joking legend out of the making of the album, and Janet tossed in the comedian’s friend, bah-dah-BOOM, and we all laughed and Carrie said everyone should have their own Janet Weiss. (Sigh.) It was a lovely moment, and really the only such moment over the course of two nights, and it was one of the reasons Jillian said she thought she liked the second night even more than the first. They are more confident now, have more fun now, but the goofiness doesn’t often pop up.

A few personal highlights. “Price Tag” is an excellent opener, driven by Janet ... OK, I’m biased, but her more demonstrative displays clearly fired up the crowd throughout the two shows. She even got extra love from the crowd when she played harmonica during “Modern Girl”. The first show truly exploded four songs in, with “What’s Mine Is Yours” ... the out-of-nowhere noise-guitar middle, the overall power behind the performance, let us know early on that this band was still the best. (On the second night, “Turn It On” preceded “What’s Mine Is Yours”, and it was the igniter.) While the old stuff like “Little Babies” and “Words and Guitar” and “Dig Me Out” predictably got the crowd going, the material from the new album was also very welcomed, with “No Cities to Love” a sing-along highlight. I was hoping to hear two songs in particular, and got one of each at the two shows. “Youth Decay” came on Night One ... it’s a favorite of mine for the ferocity of Janet’s drumming, and for the line, “I’m all about a forked tongue and a dirty house”. Late during the main set on Night Two came “Sympathy”, my favorite Corin showcase. Up to that point, I’d made it through almost two entire concerts without getting overly choked up ... I was just so happy that I was seeing them again. But “Sympathy” never fails to grab me, and Corin’s performance may have been the best I’ve witnessed, with an almost theatrical bent to her line readings, and when she held the final note about all the mommies whose hearts were breaking, for what seemed like forever, that was when I finally lost it.

The regular set ended both nights with “Entertain” and “Jumpers”, two songs I love that I also find ... not sure problematic is the word, but they don’t go down easy. “Entertain” is supposedly about lame bands, but I’ve always read it as Carrie standing down the audience, and the passion in her voice is disturbing. And “Jumpers”, which as far as I can tell is a real crowd-pleaser ... well, it’s one of my favorites, too, but it’s about jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge, and if there’s room for multiple interpretations of “Entertain”, there is nothing ambiguous about “Jumpers” ... the singer kills herself, and the final “four seconds was the longest wait” is very emotional.

Having featured the new album during the main set (it’s proof of the rightness of this hiatus-ending move, that the new album is so much a piece of what came before, and that their performances are as good as ever), the encores mostly looked back. Night One’s encores began with Corin making a pro-Planned Parenthood speech, after which she did something we had never seen over the past 17 years. Katie Larkin, the “fourth S-K member” on this tour, who spends the entire night off in a back corner, adding guitars and keyboards and percussion, comes forward to take Corin’s place on the stage and on guitar. Corin then proceeds to sing “Gimme Love” sans guitar, holding the mic “like a singer”. At one point, she ends up on the floor ... can’t say for sure what she’s doing down there, let’s just say that I’ve seen Carrie down there many times, but it’s a first in my experience for Corin. It’s as if she suddenly became Patti Smith or something.

On the second night, “Good Things” and “One More Hour” worked their way into the encore. “Good Things” is probably the first S-K song I really noticed, and “One More Hour” is simply one of the finest break-up songs of all time. Over the past nine years, both songs resonated with the context of the hiatus ... “why do good things never wanna stay” indeed. Now, they were just two songs I loved ... absent that context, I was able to bear hearing them again like I did back in the pre-hiatus days.

Both nights closed with “Modern Girl”. Carrie told us to take over singing the chorus, but she needn’t have bothered ... we were already singing. My whole life is like a picture of a sunny day.

After the second show, I told Jillian that where Carrie has been a rock star from the first moment we set eyes on her, what the band is now feels more like an entire group of rock stars. Oh, Carrie is still the one who attracts our attention the most, and that will likely never change. But the confidence I spoke of earlier has the feel of Rock Star ... not in a look-at-me egotist way, but in a we’re-good-and-we-thank-you-for-knowing way. Since the announcement of the return, I’ve often wondered what they think of all the audience love they are getting. They surely always knew they were special in the hearts of their fans. And while there’s been quite a media blitz compared to the past, Jillian pointed out that the crowd seems to be aging with them ... not as many youngsters as you’d hope. But how does it make them feel, experiencing this unavoidable mass love from their fans? For me, the point is made most clearly in the video for “No Cities to Love”, where an array of cooler-than-cool celebrities like Natasha Lyonne and Daryl from The Walking Dead sing along. The measure of their participation is that each of them in turn melts into each of us fans ... these “celebrities” are fans, too, and they are just so happy to be in a Sleater-Kinney video.

 

Setlist Junkie Stuff: Over the two nights, they played 30 different songs (7 changes from Night One to Night Two, denoted below in bold). More than half of the songs each night came from No Cities to Love or The Woods. Every album except the self-titled debut was represented at some point. Of interest to no one but me: between the two shows, they played nine songs we heard at our very first Sleater-Kinney concert back in 1998: “Dig Me Out”, “Turn It On”, “Joey Ramone”, “One More Hour”, “The End of You”, “Little Babies”, “Get Up”, “Words and Guitar”, and “Good Things”.

Price Tag Price Tag
Fangless Fangless
Oh! Turn It On
What’s Mine Is Yours What’s Mine Is Yours
Ironclad Oh!
Little Babies Surface Envy
A New Wave Get Up
No Anthems No Anthems
All Hands on the Bad One Bury Our Friends
Surface Envy Rollercoaster
No Cities to Love The End of You
One Beat No Cities to Love
Bury Our Friends A New Wave
Youth Decay The Fox
The Fox Words and Guitar
Words and Guitar Sympathy
Entertain Entertain
Jumpers Jumpers
   
Gimme Love Dig Me Out
I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone Good Things
Dig Me Out Ironclad
Let’s Call It Love One More Hour
Modern Girl Modern Girl

 

A handful of videos have already surfaced. The best are from concertkid. Here’s one, from Night One:

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