tv 2016: stranger things through westworld

Stranger Things.Stranger Things does a wonderful job of presenting life from a kid’s perspective. There is no condescension, just an acceptance that kids see things their own way. The kids are far from perfect ... their silly squabbles are there for all to see ... but their loyalty is there, as well. It’s not just the kids whose perspective we get ... Winona Ryder’s mom, creeping into near madness, has her own definite way of seeing, and it is among the strongest parts of the show. Stranger Things is full of ominous paranoia and a hearty nostalgia for the period it recreates. It has its ups and down, but then, I never expect cheesy sci-fi horror to be perfect ... I just expect it to be fun. Stranger Things is fun.”

Supergirl. “Mostly harmless, with a fresh performance by Melissa Benoist in the title role. I think it’s mostly froth, although some find more depth. The kind of show where, if I get behind, I’ll probably forget to watch it any more, but so far, I’ve kept up.”

Timeless. “The first few episodes show a decent time-travel drama with a decent cast and decent recreations of the past. Co-showrunner Shawn Ryan’s work is always worth a look, and if you like time-travel stories, this will be right up your alley. Plus, it’s nice to see Abigail Spencer getting work after Rectify. Nothing special, but I’m still watching.”

Transparent. I like it, but I don’t feel obliged to binge, because I don’t like it that much. The Pfeffermans are mostly insufferable, which may be why I can’t watch more than an episode or two at a time. There is some wonderful acting, but very few characters I’d want to spend time with.

The Walking Dead. “As of this writing, I’m only one episode behind, but I’m not sure I’ll continue watching. Six seasons is enough, I guess. I always thought this was a good zombie show that was tarted up with character stories, but it’s true, a few of those characters grew on me over time. But starting last season, the creators starting fucking with the audience, and I don’t feel like being fucked with anymore. Plus, at some point, it’s just ridiculous that this show gets away with so much killing (because the victims are already dead). I’m all for TV violence, but don’t be coy (see Ash vs Evil Dead).” I haven’t watched a single episode since I wrote this, and I don’t miss it.

Westworld. “Gorgeous to look at, with a stellar cast, a bit like Timeless with a budget. The producers are trying for something big, but they are also big fans of keeping viewers in the dark about the ultimate scenario for the show. This is trickier than it used to be, since the Internet allows for hive-mind break downs of every detail. I have a feeling this is a less-than-meets-the-eye show, but it definitely pleases the eye.” After the season finale, I definitely think there is less than meets the eye.

 Stranger Things, The Lights:

Supergirl Season 2 trailer:

Timeless trailer:

Transparent Season 3 trailer:

Westworld trailer:

 


tv 2016: penny dreadful through the strain

Penny Dreadful. “There were all the great fictional characters thrown together: Dr. Frankenstein, his monster, and the Bride ... Dorian Gray ... Dr. Jekyll ... The Wolfman ... Dracula and Dr. Seward and Mina Harker and Van Helsing and Renfield ... I half expected Abbott and Costello to show up. But in all of this, Eva Green rose above the rest. She was the best thing about a very good show.” Looking back, I think Penny Dreadful might have been more than just a "very good show".

Rectify. “The best show currently on TV (The Americans is between seasons). Its glacial pace turns away most viewers ... it’s a gift that creator Ray McKinnon has been given the chance to tell the story in full, given the poor ratings. Recently, I decided the show reminded me of soap operas, where it takes months to resolve anything. Except I don’t expect things to be resolved on Rectify. I can only hope that sometime in the future, people catch up with it on streaming, and kick themselves for missing out in the first place. Aden Young, the unknown-to-me star, is as good as anyone, week after week. And this is what Abigail Spencer did before Timeless. If you actually want to take my advice, this is the show to start with.” Since I wrote this, Rectify’s series finale has been shown. There was more resolution than I expected, but even then, it was very much in tune with how Rectify worked. As Aden Young as Daniel said, “I’m cautiously optimistic.” I’ll emphasize this point one last time: Rectify is one of the best series to ever appear on television.

Shameless. “Showtime always lets their shows run for too long. That would seem to be a problem here, but somehow, Shameless is still very good. The changes in the characters over the years are believable (at least within the cockeyed world of the show), Emmy Rossum deserved more than one of those awards named after her, and I’m glad it’s still on. Oddly, the least-interesting character is the one played by William H. Macy, the de facto star. Macy is excellent, his character is not.”

Soundbreaking. Terrific documentary series about music recording. Serves as a history of the music, and covers many bases. Especially good on the ways advances in technology led to an expansion of artistic possibilities. I could see this being used in the classroom, but it’s not nearly as dry as that might sound. If the subject interests you at all, I suspect you’ll be enthralled.

The Strain. “Another zombie show, this one doesn’t try for overarching significance, which for me means it’s better than The Walking Dead. I care about the characters, and there’s some good acting here, but this isn’t a classic.” I’d add that you won’t find The Walking Dead in these TV 2016 posts ... I quit watching after the recent season premiere.

Penny Dreadful Season 3 trailer:

Scene from Season Four of Rectify:

Shameless Season Seven trailer:

Trailer for Soundbreaking:

The Strain Season 3 trailer:


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tv 2016: the night manager through outlander

The Night Manager. Classy mini-series based on a le Carré novel, with a cast headed by Tom Hiddleston and Hugh Laurie, along with other stalwarts of modern television like Olivia Colman, David Harewood, and the ever-present Tobias Menzies. (I first saw him as Brutus in the great Rome, but he has really kicked it into another gear the last few years. Besides The Night Manager, he was in an episode of Black Mirror, was in Game of Thrones, The Honorable Woman, a regular (in two roles) in Outlander, and the English comedy Catastrophe. All in the last three years.) It won a couple of Emmys, and probably would play well if binged. We watched an episode a week, and liked it, but I wouldn’t go any further.

The Night Of. “The first of eight episodes is as good as TV gets, and if the rest of the series can’t live up to that introduction, it’s still plenty good. Zaillian and Price work hard to elevate The Night Of above the usual crime drama, then turn it into something far more ordinary at the end. It’s a shame, because much of that last episode is equal to what came before. The result is a series where the first episode was an A+, the next six episodes were A/A-, but the last episode fluctuated between A and C.”

Orange Is the New Black. Now we’re four seasons in, and still going strong. The cast is enormous, which creates problems when trying to tell everyone’s story, but for the most part, Jenji Kohan pulls it off, adding new characters, changing things around to keep it fresh. The characters have evolved over the years ... no one is stagnant. And great acting abounds. Special shout out to Samira Wiley.

Orphan Black. Fans of the show might differ with me, but as a series, Orphan Black has about run its course. But it could run for another ten seasons and I’d be watching, just to see what Tatiana Maslany will manage next. It’s a decent show, but Maslany is far and away the best part. This year, she finally won her Emmy.

Outlander. A fascinating show, gorgeous to look at, intriguing in its narrative (a romance with sci-fi thrown in), and remarkable in its female-centric view of sexuality. (Maureen Ryan wrote strongly about this in Season One.) Showrunner Ronald D. Moore once again demonstrates a facility with genre fiction, taking us far beyond our preconceived notions, much he did with Battlestar Galactica. Drawing on a series of novels by Diana Gabaldon, Moore is true to the books while creating something special on its own. And Caitriona Balfe is exquisite.

Night Manager trailer:

The Night Of trailer:

Orange Is the New Black Season 4 trailer:

Orphan Black Season 4 trailer:

Outlander Season 2 trailer:

 

 


tv 2016: jane the virgin through mr. robot

Steven Rubio's Online Life

 


tv 2016: fleabag through the 100

Fleabag. “It’s one of the best accomplishments of this television season. Creator/writer/star Phoebe Waller-Bridge is the key to what makes Fleabag great, which given her multiple duties might seem obvious. I’m inclined to hail a new star, and ask where she has been all of our lives, but of course, she’s been around for a long time (she’s 31, and has been at this for a decade). It’s her face that does it. Her unnamed character regularly breaks the fourth wall, which is a cliché by this point, but she makes it work because 1) she gives herself great dialogue, and most importantly 2) because of the wordless times when she stares at the camera and tells us everything we need by facial expressions. She sucks us in from the very first scene ... she is so engaging in a recognizably human way that we don’t just want to root for her, we want to be her.”

Game of Thrones. "There is no question that Game of Thrones is treated with respect in part because of the network on which it airs. It has won 26 Emmys and counting. Even if you don’t like it, you can’t escape it.” The most admirable thing about Game of Thrones is that it maintains a level of consistency. Some seasons are better than others, just as some episodes are better than others. But, to this point, you always know what you are getting: a quality show with violence and sex, with the latter often exploitative. The acting is variable, but the good actors are great. Many of the characters are memorable. I can’t imagine anyone out there is still making up their minds about this show.

Girls. What does it say that I don’t seem to have written about Girls Season 5, and that I had to look it up to remind myself what happened during the year? Perhaps it’s more important that I am still watching. A look at critical reaction tells us a lot. According to Metacritic, the “Metascore” for the first five seasons has been 87, 84, 76, 75, and 73. This shows a gradual fade, but 73 translates to “generally favorable”. Girls may not be the center of the zeitgeist any longer, but that’s probably good for the show.

Happy Valley. Season 2 was as good as the first season. Happy Valley benefits from having short seasons (six episodes), and from the stunning performance of Sarah Lancashire in the lead. Downton Abbey fans will enjoy seeing O’Brien (both seasons) and Molesley (S2). Advance warning: Happy Valley is often quite dark.

The 100. “Became quite problematic in its third season, yet I may be looking forward to next season more than any other show on this list, and it’s another I recommend you catch up on (be aware it takes a few episodes before it reaches its potential). The season finale proved that the creators of The 100 know quite well how to properly send off a beloved character. If the send off we got had occurred in, say, Episode 307, I'm guessing the uproar would have been reduced, or even absent. That those creators felt perfectly happy saving this send off for the finale, while participating in a trope that lost them a significant part of their viewership, is remarkably clueless at best. I love The 100, and I loved most of the season finale. I really loved that send off. But it pisses me off the way it was mishandled. For many people, Episode 307 made The 100 beyond redemption. I'm still here. But part of me wishes I'd just skipped all the episodes between 307 and the two-part finale. (After Ep. 307, I wrote, ‘That moment when what happens in fiction is so affecting you can't feel the real world for awhile.’)”

The now-infamous first scene of Fleabag:

Game of Thrones Season 6 trailer:

Girls Season 5 trailer:

Happy Valley Season 2 trailer:

The 100 Season 3 trailer:

 


tv 2016: americans through atlanta

Much of what follows over the next several days will be re-posts of what I've written during the year, although the first entry is all new. (I thought I posted this four days ago, but it seems to have disappeared.)

The Americans. I haven’t written much about this show over the years, for no apparent reason, since if it’s not the best show on TV, it’s in the top two. There have been four seasons, with two to go, so you have plenty of time to catch up. The premise is intriguing: in the early 1980s, we follow the Jennings, a typical American nuclear family except Mom and Dad are secretly Soviet spies. This angle never gets old, but what raises The Americans above pretty much every other show on the air is that the premise isn’t even the main reason to tune in every week. The ongoing story of the Jennings is the key, and Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell have been great since day one. As spies, they are required to manipulate others ... Rhys’ “Philip” even marries another woman who is the secretary for an important FBI supervisor. Philip and “Elizabeth” take different approaches to their jobs ... Philip comes to appreciate life in the USA more than Elizabeth does. They also find themselves becoming closer as a couple, having been originally assigned each other. There are a number of other fine actors, especially Noah Emmerich as an FBI agent who moves in across the street from the Jennings, and Margo Martindale as one of the Jennings’ handlers. Luckily, the show has a winner in Holly Taylor, who plays Philip and Elizabeth’s teenage daughter, Paige. Teenage characters are often annoying, but Taylor has grown with her role, and been given more to do as a result. One interesting plot twist is that Paige discovers religion, which really pisses her Communist mother off. Meanwhile, the violence on the show is occasional, but often brutal, even in arguably the most romantic moment of the entire series, when Philip has to extract a tooth from Elizabeth, without an anesthetic. One of the only undisputed “A” shows on television today.

Angie Tribeca.Angie Tribeca, like its spiritual father Police Squad, is so relentless is its destruction of clichés that it’s hard to watch an ordinary show after seeing an episode of Angie. Things that aren’t supposed to be funny on something like Supergirl remind you of something similar on Angie Tribeca that was supposed to be funny, and you end up laughing inappropriately.”

Ash vs. Evil Dead. “Perhaps the easiest TV series in history to evaluate. If you like the Evil Dead movies, you will like this show. If not, you won’t. And I suppose if you’ve never even heard of the Evil Dead movies, you won’t like this either. This is possibly the goriest show we’ve ever seen on TV, which is right in line with the movies (if for some reason you aren’t up to date, this show is part of the Evil Dead universe, taking place after the events of Army of Darkness). The entire show is over the top, including the gore, which can’t be taken on a serious level ... the inspiration for all of this is the Three Stooges. No one tries to make a case for the Evil Dead universe as meaningful ... it’s just a silly gore fest that has the honesty to know what it is about. Plus, Bruce Campbell and Lucy Lawless. One of my favorite shows, but if ever the cliché “Your Mileage May Vary” was appropriate, it’s here.

Atlanta. “Might be the best new show in recent times, although it’s erratic. Donald Glover created and stars in it, and he offers a small world that feels real (whether or not it actually is), with characters (and actors) to fill their roles perfectly. This show might get so good in future seasons that we’ll look back on Season One as a mere warm-up, but it stands on its own.”

The Americans Season 4 promo:

Angie Tribeca Season 2 Episode 1 "Hyper Binge":

Ash vs Evil Dead Season 2 Trailer (NSFW):

Atlanta trailer:


television, catching up

It’s probably a combination of the lessening of my obsession to post as this blog approaches its 15th birthday, and the different ways television is consumed now, but I don’t post on TV as often as I used to. My pattern was generally to write about a show at the beginning of a season and at the end, but now, we’re all in different places with various shows. There are still shows with regular weekly schedules, but even there, I sense that some people prefer to wait for a season to end so they can binge-watch. And there are the streaming series that are usually released as an entire season, so a show might be released on a Friday and by Monday, people have already watched the entire season. So I don’t know when to start writing. I have no problem writing about old movies, but TV seems more immediate somehow.

Anyway, here are some of the things I’ve been watching, in alphabetical order:

Agents of SHIELD (not the exact title, but tough ... Season 4, ABC). I’m neither here nor there with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and I preferred the now-cancelled Agent Carter to this one. But I like the cast, especially Clark Gregg, and if it often feels like a poor step-sibling to the big Marvel movies, perhaps that’s a point in its favor.

Ash vs Evil Dead (Season 2, Starz). Perhaps the easiest TV series in history to evaluate. If you like the Evil Dead movies, you will like this show. If not, you won’t. And I suppose if you’ve never even heard of the Evil Dead movies, you won’t like this either. This is possibly the goriest show we’ve ever seen on TV, which is right in line with the movies (if for some reason you aren’t up to date, this show is part of the Evil Dead universe, taking place after the events of Army of Darkness). The entire show is over the top, including the gore, which can’t be taken on a serious level ... the inspiration for all of this is the Three Stooges. No one tries to make a case for the Evil Dead universe as meaningful ... it’s just a silly gorefest that has the honesty to know what it is about. Plus, Bruce Campbell and Lucy Lawless. One of my favorite shows, but if ever the cliché “Your Mileage May Vary” was appropriate, it’s here.

Atlanta (One season, FX). Might be the best new show in recent times, although it’s erratic. Donald Glover created and stars in it, and he offers a small world that feels real (whether or not it actually is), with characters (and actors) to fill their roles perfectly. This show might get so good in future seasons that we’ll look back on Season One as a mere warm-up, but it stands on its own.

Better Things, Fleabag, Insecure, Lady Dynamite (you can find them if you’re interested). I’m sticking these all together because they are all half-hour comedy/dramas with women at the center. Beyond that, they aren’t really alike, but they do run together in my mind. Fleabag is the only one I’ve finished ... Phoebe Waller-Bridge should be a star ... but I wouldn’t say it’s better than the others, at least not yet. I recommend all of them.

Black Mirror (Season 3, Netflix). Not sure this makes sense, but I like this show enough that I don’t feel the need to binge. Each episode is a stand-alone, which is probably the main reason ... I can sit down for an hour, and feel I’ve gotten enough for one day. So I am not caught up with this season, but I’ve liked what I’ve seen.

Designated Survivor (Season 1, ABC). Kiefer Sutherland’s new show, as a man who becomes president after everyone else in the federal government is killed. Obviously, we’re reminded of 24, even though in fairness the show doesn’t play that game too much. More detrimental to its potential is that it reminds me of Battlestar Galactica, which also begins with a minor governmental official falling into the presidency. BSG was one of the best shows ever; Designated Survivor isn’t really trying to be that good. So I may not make it much longer with this one, when I could just watch BSG again.

The Fall (Season 3, Netflix). This is a British series starring Gillian Anderson as a British police detective and Jamie Dornan as the “Belfast Strangler”. If you are interested in binging, there are a total of 17 episodes. The two leads do great jobs, and the show does well at showing the strangler’s humanity as well as his crimes. The relationship between the two gets more complicated over time. Overall, it’s nothing too special, perhaps a bit like SVU if Mariska Hargitay was the lead figure from the start. Especially good for fans of Gillian Anderson.

Jane the Virgin (Season 3, CW). Remains one of the most inventive, enjoyable shows on the air. Gina Rodriguez, Jaime Camil, and Anthony Mendez are all great, the entire cast is good, and the meta approach to the telenovela is well-done. Plus, they have managed to deal with the “Virgin” aspect of the show with intelligence and believability.

Rectify (4th and final season, Sundance). The best show currently on TV (The Americans is between seasons). Its glacial pace turns away most viewers ... it’s a gift that creator Ray McKinnon has been given the chance to tell the story in full, given the poor ratings. Recently, I decided the show reminded me of soap operas, where it takes months to resolve anything. Except I don’t expect things to be resolved on Rectify. I can only hope that sometime in the future, people catch up with it on streaming, and kick themselves for missing out in the first place. Aden Young, the unknown-to-me star, is as good as anyone, week after week. And this is what Abigail Spencer did before Timeless. If you actually want to take my advice, this is the show to start with.

Shameless (Season 7, Showtime). Showtime always lets their shows run for too long. That would seem to be a problem here, but somehow, Shameless is still very good. The changes in the characters over the years are believable (at least within the cockeyed world of the show), Emmy Rossum deserved more than one of those awards named after her, and I’m glad it’s still on. Oddly, the least-interesting character is the one played by William H. Macy, the de facto star. Macy is excellent, his character is not.

The Strain (Three seasons, with one more to go, FX). Another zombie show, this one doesn’t try for overarching significance, which for me means it’s better than The Walking Dead. I care about the characters, and there’s some good acting here, but this isn’t a classic.

Supergirl (Season 2, CW). Mostly harmless, with a fresh performance by Melissa Benoist in the title role. I think it’s mostly froth, although some find more depth. The kind of show where, if I get behind, I’ll probably forget to watch it any more, but so far, I’ve kept up.

Timeless (Season 1, NBC). The first few episodes show a decent time-travel drama with a decent cast and decent recreations of the past. Co-showrunner Shawn Ryan’s work is always worth a look, and if you like time-travel stories, this will be right up your alley. Plus, it’s nice to see Abigail Spencer getting work after Rectify. Nothing special, but I’m still watching.

Transparent (Season 3, Amazon). I mention this because most people have at least heard of it. I like it, yet I don’t binge-gobble ... Season 3 was released in September, and I’m still 6 episodes behind. Which must say something, no matter how much I like the show.

The Walking Dead (Season 7, AMC). As of this writing, I’m only one episode behind, but I’m not sure I’ll continue watching. Six seasons is enough, I guess. I always thought this was a good zombie show that was tarted up with character stories, but it’s true, a few of those characters grew on me over time. But starting last season, the creators starting fucking with the audience, and I don’t feel like being fucked with anymore. Plus, at some point, it’s just ridiculous that this show gets away with so much killing (because the victims are already dead). I’m all for TV violence, but don’t be coy (see Ash vs Evil Dead, above).

Westworld (Season 1, HBO). Gorgeous to look at, with a stellar cast, a bit like Timeless with a budget. The producers are trying for something big, but they are also big fans of keeping viewers in the dark about the ultimate scenario for the show. This is trickier than it used to be, since the Internet allows for hive-mind break downs of every detail. I have a feeling this is a less-than-meets-the-eye show, but it definitely pleases the eye.

I’m leaving out some shows that will be returning, hopefully soon. The Americans (FX) is the best show on TV ... I highly recommend catching up with it during its off-season. The 100 (CW) became quite problematic in its third season, yet I may be looking forward to next season more than any other show on this list, and it’s another I recommend you catch up on (be aware it takes a few episodes before it reaches its potential). There are the usuals: Broad City, The Leftovers, Orphan Black, Outlander, Sense8. A special shout out to Outlander, because it is a special show. As usual, I haven’t said much about plots or concepts here ... if you’re interested in any of these but can’t quite figure out what they are about, well, that’s why we have the Internet. And apologies for all the shows I’ve forgotten here ... the pitfalls of Peak TV.


ash, the evil dead, s. clay wilson, and my wife

My wife doesn’t have a birthday. She has a Birthday Month. So I have to be on my toes all through October, not just on the 4th (which is what the rest of us would call her birthday).

Last night we settled in to watch TV. She wanted to start with Designated Survivor, the new, so-so- Kiefer Sutherland show. I was feeling a bit sad ... silly, really, but I wished we liked more of the same TV shows and movies. Designated Survivor may turn out to be a show we watch together, but it kind of gives “common ground” a bad name.

After that, we watched the season opener of Ash vs Evil Dead. This is more like it, I thought, I like this show a lot, which reveals my real definition of “shows we watch together”: something I like that she tolerates. Except she doesn’t tolerate Ash vs Evil Dead, she likes it, too. And she occasionally laughs, which if you know Robin, you know laughing at TV isn’t a regular occurrence. But it’s one of the reasons I love her so ... she’ll sit quietly as a comedy plays, then laugh at arguably the goriest show in TV history (gore isn’t inherently funny, but ridiculous, over-the-top gore is).

And if Season One was the Goriest Show of All Time, Season Two had an early scene that easily topped anything we’d seen before. And we laughed. I can’t find the scene on YouTube, which is probably just as well. The best I can do is this Season Two trailer, which was apparently too gory for Comic Con:

Later in the evening, we spent a few minutes chuckling over a couple of S. Clay Wilson drawings.

Now I ask you: what kind of moron would think he and his wife had few shared tastes, when she laughed at Evil Dead and S. Clay Wilson?

Yep, I’m a moron.

And my wife is the greatest.

stevenrobin


fleabag

There are a lot of woman-centered half-hour series on television these days, which is a welcome trend. Besides the ensemble productions like Girls and Orange Is the New Black (which actually runs for an hour), there’s Broad City and Lady Dynamite and One Mississippi and Better Things, and the subject of this post, the wonderful Fleabag. These shows don’t just feature women, they are created by women. Many of them seem at least partly autobiographical, although I don’t know how far down that road I’d want to go. Broad City is my favorite, but after a six-episode first season, Fleabag is running a close second.

Creator/writer/star Phoebe Waller-Bridge is the key to what makes Fleabag great, which given her multiple duties might seem obvious. I’m inclined to hail a new star, and ask where she has been all of our lives, but of course, she’s been around for a long time (she’s 31, and has been at this for a decade), even appearing in things I’ve seen, even if I don’t remember her (the second season of Broadchurch, Albert Nobbs). It’s her face that does it. Her unnamed character regularly breaks the fourth wall, which is a cliché by this point, but she makes it work because 1) she gives herself great dialogue, and most importantly 2) because of the wordless times when she stares at the camera and tells us everything we need by facial expressions. She sucks us in from the very first scene ... she is so engaging in a recognizably human way that we don’t just want to root for her, we want to be her.

That first scene also establishes the sexual frankness that is a running component of Fleabag:

Her eyes are fabulous, far more than mere windows into her soul. I want to give her eyes an Emmy.

This may all seem run of the mill in 2016, half Bridget Jones, half Sex and the City. Waller-Bridge’s character is like a blend of Abby and Ilana in Broad City, sexually adventurous but always thinking about what she is about to do. It’s a unique take, no matter how much you think you’ve seen it already.

While many of the half-hour shows today are mostly dramas that get labeled comedies because once in awhile you laugh, Fleabag is more obviously a comedy. Here, it’s not the jokes that sneak up on you, but instead the raw emotions. The final episode does not come out of nowhere ... looking back, you can easily see how it was set up. But when we see Waller-Bridge’s character deal with the consequences of her actions, it’s heartbreaking. And again, it’s Waller-Bridge who gets the lion’s share of the credit. She wrote the prize-winning one-woman play on which the series is based, she wrote all of the episodes of the series, she plays the lead role (I can’t remember, but she may be on screen for the entire six episodes). It’s one of the best accomplishments of this television season. A BBC Three show that ran during the summer, it can now be binged in its entirety on Amazon. A.


mr. robot season two

Mr. Robot sneaks up on you. Last season, I got about halfway through and then it fell into the bottomless, always full pit of DVR hell. It was interesting, and Rami Malek was great, but there was always something else to watch.

Eventually, I caught up, inspired just before Season Two began, to see what all the fuss was about. I’m not sure what happened, except that maybe I just wasn’t ready for it during my first attempt. But by the time I finished binging Season One, I couldn’t wait for the new season to begin. And Mr. Robot became one of the few shows that I had to watch when it was aired.

In the season finale, a character recites the William Carlos Williams poem “The Red Wheelbarrow”. This poem is ever present in high school and college English classes, where students grapple with the deep meanings said to reside inside the poem’s sixteen words. I am not here to explicate the poem, nor am I here to specifically place it in the context of Mr. Robot. But one thing seems crucial to me: the meanings that reside inside Mr. Robot are often just as hard for viewers to ascertain as Williams’ meanings are for students.

Or maybe it’s something as simple as writer Sam Esmail wanting to give his character something short to recite.

Mr. Robot got a lot of acclaim for its first season, in particular the ways in which the show, which was unlike other series on the USA Network, expanded that network's possibilities. (In truth, Mr. Robot is unlike most series on most networks.) Whatever constraints USA might have placed on Esmail for Season One seemed to disappear for Season Two, perhaps hiding under all the acclaim. Remarkably, Esmail rarely resorted to self-indulgence, and when he did (the “Alf” episode), it was often so fun no one cared about indulgence. But Esmail walked a thin line with what seemed to me to be conscious obfuscation. While some obsessive viewers correctly anticipated some of the more startling plot moments, others (i.e. me) were simultaneously intrigued by the mystery and frustrated by the lack of revelation. Yes, Mr. Robot specializes in big, grand revelations, and they are part of what makes the series compelling. But they are satisfying in part because Esmail has been leading us along for long stretches. (Again, for me ... others claimed to know everything before it happened.)

We haven’t yet fallen into Lost territory yet, but the potential is there.

Meanwhile, Rami Malek’s Emmy was well-deserved, and the casting in general effectively matches actors and characters. Carly Chaikin looks like Malek/Elliot’s sister, and she does great work as a bad-ass who is vulnerable on the inside (but not as much as that cliché might suggest). I don’t think Michael Cristofer has ever given a bad performance. Best of all is B.D. Wong as a mysterious character (are there any other kinds on this show?) who is both a transgender head of the “Dark Army” and the Minister of State Security for China.

Like I say, there’s nothing else like this out there right now. That novelty won’t carry the show forever, although Rami Malek might be able to pull it off. Suffice to say that, at the end of an erratic finale to an erratic season, I can’t wait for Season Three to begin.