film fatales #41: morvern callar (lynne ramsay, 2002)
music friday: 1993

tv catch up: killing eve, legion, the looming tower

Killing Eve. In a post about TV actors, I wrote, "[Jodie] Comer has made Villanelle into the most fascinating character on TV. (Meanwhile, Sandra Oh is killing it as Eve.)" I stand by both parts of that comment. But I may have been a bit too much taken with Comer's work in the flashier of the two roles. Matt Zoller Seitz thinks so: "The Best Actress on TV Is Killing Eve’s Sandra Oh".

Oh’s entire career has been leading to this. The role of Eve asks her to blend the star charisma she exhibited on Grey’s Anatomy and the daffy sex appeal that she brought to a supporting role in Sideways (stealing scenes from Thomas Haden Church, which is about as easy as stealing gold from Fort Knox). Oh is not just up to the challenge, she piles on details until they become emblematic of the series as well as the character. This is the performance of the year so far, in any medium. For all the reasons mentioned in this piece, and for many more reasons we won’t even discover until we watch the whole thing a few more times, this is quietly revolutionary acting on a quietly revolutionary series. There’s before Killing Eve, and there’s after. Phoebe Waller-Bridge made that happen, and Sandra Oh made it real.

The mention of Phoebe Waller-Bridge is important ... she developed the series and wrote four of the eight episodes. Fleabag wasn't a fluke ... and Waller-Bridge clearly handles more than one genre.

Legion. I only mention this program because I quit watching it. The Purposely Obscure Genre is not my favorite. Legion is so stylish, so unique, that I gave it a chance. Heck, I gave Season One an A-. But I only watched a couple of Season Two episodes before I realized I didn't enjoy it, didn't understand it, and was angered by that purposeful obscurity. So I quit. Your mileage may vary.

The Looming Tower. This miniseries from Hulu told the fact-based story of the buildup to 9/11, emphasizing the feud between the FBI and CIA and how that feud affected America's ability (or inability) to see what was right before various eyes. It stuck close enough to the facts to feel real, it was fairly clear in presenting the byzantine plot, and it mostly avoided kissing the ass of the FBI or CIA. It's the kind of show my wife likes, but one that I enjoyed as well, if not as much as she did. There was some interesting casting ... Tahar Rahim (A Prophet) as a Muslim FBI agent, Michael Stuhlbarg (Boardwalk Empire's Arnold Rothstein) as Richard Clarke, Alec Baldwin as CIA Director George Tenet, and others. Jeff Daniels played John O'Neill, the FBI head of counterterrorism, and he was good, although for some reason he often bugged the shit out of me. (Whether than was Daniel or O'Neill, I don't know.) If it sounds good to you, you'll probably like it ... it delivers. I wouldn't say it was great, though.

 

Comments