music friday: 1970
logan (james mangold, 2017)

film fatales #36: mudbound (dee rees, 2017)

It's difficult at times to figure out what a director's contribution is to a film, since movies are such a collaborative art form. One assumption I make is if a movie has a bunch of good performances by the actors, the director should get at least part of the credit. Well, the director and the person in charge of casting. Mudbound has several actors who are perhaps lesser known than big stars, but who have a track record of good work. Garrett Hedlund will always be Dean Moriarty to me, which is silly, but he has a charisma that warrants a bigger profile. I may just be lucky, but I've seen several of Carey Mulligan's movies, and every one of them has been at the least good. Jason Clarke is always popping up in things where I first think "hey, it's that guy" only to realize he's more than that. Jason Mitchell is just getting started, but he made quite an impression as Eazy-E in Straight Outta Compton. Jonathan Banks really is a That Guy (IMDB says he has 167 acting credits). And, of course, Mary J. Blige has been nominated for a Supporting Actress Oscar for her work here (she also has a nomination for Best Song).

So yeah, I think Dee Rees deserves praise for the universally strong performances in Mudbound. (Don't want to forget those heads of casting, Ashley Ingram and Billy Hopkins.) Honestly, I'm a bit surprised Blige got an acting nom ... she's fine, for sure, but she doesn't jump off the screen. Maybe that's why it works ... she underplays a role that could go into all sorts of excesses. And whenever she and Rob Morgan (who plays her husband) are on screen together, they avoid sentimentality and are more believable for it.

Mudbound looks great, which gives me a chance to tip my cap to history: Rachel Morrison is the first woman to get an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography.

Rees does a good job of showing us who these characters are. None of them are mere stereotypes.  The history of America is such that we always know things can take a dark turn, and in fact they do ... very dark. But we are especially affected by the darkness because Rees takes her time getting there. It hurts more knowing these people as intimately as we do. 9/10.

(Explanation of the Film Fatales Series.)

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