music friday: gerry goffin
get it anyway, anyhow

by request/blu-ray series # 22: i saw the devil (jee-woon kim, 2010)

(This was recommended by Kasey, and was a birthday gift from Sue and Paul.)

Another film in my continuing education in recent Korean cinema. It’s my first Jee-woon Kim movie, as well as my first movie with Byung-hun Lee. Min-sik Choi was also in the excellent Oldboy. I’m starting to recognize some of these actors (Choi is hard to miss, and he’s terrific ... Doona Bae is in the new series Sense8, and she looked familiar to me, so I looked her up and saw she was in The Host). When I buried myself in Hong Kong movies back in the day, one of the best parts was seeing the top stars turn up in multiple movies, and I’ve got a lot of Korean films on my to-see list, so perhaps this will happen again.

I tend to question my wife’s love of the TV show Criminal Minds, which deals with serial killers. It seems from my outsider’s perspective to be a sick show that spends a lot of time showing women being tortured. Well, as long as I watch movies like I Saw the Devil, I have no room to talk. It’s like an episode of Criminal Minds, if it was rated X and the heroes became as sick as the villains. It’s even worse than that sounds. An accurate description comes from one of the film’s taglines: “He’s not getting even. He’s just getting started.” When the hero catches the villain, the movie still has an hour or so to go, and you may find yourself wondering what might fill the remaining time. Without giving away too many spoilers, let’s just say the second half of that tagline is a big hint.

There may be some redeeming social commentary here. The old “to defeat a monster, you must become a monster” angle is well-represented. There isn’t a lot of class context ... the victims are women, but the extreme violence is often directed towards men. There’s cannibalism, but I think it’s there for comic relief, believe it or not. The cinematography and editing and acting are all top-notch, which makes it all the more disturbing.

Min-sik Choi is so good as the villain, and his character is so evil, that you can’t help but root for the hero, not only to solve the crimes and stop the bad guy, but to extract some measure of revenge. Which, of course, implicates the audience in actions as evil as those of the bad guy.

You should know now whether you’ll like I Saw the Devil. It goes far enough to discourage many viewers, and I understand this ... there are movies I won’t see, too. If you can stomach it, though, this is very well done. Oldboy remains my favorite Korean film, though, with Mother in second place. 7/10.

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