homeboy makes good
mitch miller

what i watched last week

These actually cover more than a week … for some reason last week’s got posted too soon, leaving me with a couple of leftovers.

Slacker. It’s interesting to watch this movie after seeing 20 years of Linklater’s work. All of these voices jabbering away about whatever is on their minds … we get similar people doing similar things in Before Sunrise and Before Sunset, in Waking Life and A Scanner Darkly. Something that seemed new and unique in 1991 now seems like What Richard Linklater Does. I’ve liked every one of his movies I’ve seen (with the exception of Tape, which I hated), and if Slacker isn’t the best of them (I’m partial to Dazed and Confused), it’s innovative and worth a return visit every couple of decades. 7/10.

Green Zone. This movie works, but I’m not sure why. Matt Damon makes a good soldier with a brain, the feeling of dread would seem to match life in Iraq at the time the film takes place, and Paul Greengrass doesn’t overdo his usual frenetic camera work until the final action sequence, which is exciting but confusing. And the movie calls the U.S. on the lies we told ourselves to get the war started. Good movie, but far from great. 7/10.

Ginger Snaps 2: Unleashed. Remarkably, it doesn’t suck. It’s not Evil Dead II good, but it’s good enough to watch if you were a fan of the first one. Still, the first one is a classic, while the second doesn’t suck. 6/10.

Chungking Express. Watching this the same week I watched Slacker made for interesting comparisons … not that they are similar films, but because both directors offer unique, uncompromising visions. Wong Kar-Wai may be his generation’s Godard, but as is appropriate, that is both a positive and a negative. When I first saw this movie, I wasn’t impressed, but once In the Mood for Love made me a Wong fan forever, I’ve been willing to reassess his movies, and I’ve enjoyed Chungking Express every time I’ve seen it since. This time, I realized how much I prefer the second part. I also notice how young Tony Leung is (I guess I need to watch Hard-Boiled again, since he’s even younger in that one, or Bullet in the Head, which is before all of them). Faye Wong makes you wish she made more movies … Brigitte Lin is one of the most beautiful actresses ever, and there are hints of this if you look closely past the blonde wig and large sunglasses. #320 on the They Shoot Pictures, Don’t They list of the top 1000 films of all time. 7/10.

City Hunter. A very stupid movie, redeemed a bit by a great fight at the finale between Jackie Chan and Richard Norton. There are a lot of very weird things here, which, if you are fan of the original anime, might seem appropriate. I don’t know the original, and most of what’s on the screen flops. A fight scene where the two combatants become characters from Street Fighter II is better than the fight scene in a movie theatre playing Game of Death, with Jackie fighting two tall black guys while Bruce Lee takes on Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on the screen. There are a lot of beautiful babes running around … the unstoppable Chingmy Yau comes off the best, but really, they’re as much eye candy as anything else … this ain’t exactly The Heroic Trio. 5/10.

Mother. A genre film, I suppose, although it encompasses multiple genres and defies our expectations along the way. It isn’t a slapdash approach by any means … it isn’t there just to show us how many movies director Joon-Ho Bong has seen. Bong is quite precise. The Host took the monster movie to a different place, and was more loony than Mother. Mother may be the better film, though. It probably says more about me than about the relative merits of the two films that I gave The Host 7/10, while I’ll give Mother 8/10.

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